AFTERWORLDS SCOTT WESTERFELD PDF

Start your review of Afterworlds Afterworlds 1 Write a review Shelves: giveaway-entries , young-adult-and-new-adult , paranormal-and-supernatural , reviewed , realistic-fiction-or-contemporary , quirky , edelweiss , , reviews-to-transfer , humor So, I kinda loved this book, its intelligence, its meta-awareness, and the way a lovely coming-of-age story is packaged inside a clever satire-bordering-on-love-story to the YA publishing world. As such, Im baffled by the somewhat low reviews on this one. I could be completely off-base, and maybe I am seeing what I want to see because I want an excuse for liking this book as much So, I kinda loved this book, its intelligence, its meta-awareness, and the way a lovely coming-of-age story is packaged inside a clever satire-bordering-on-love-story to the YA publishing world. First, a little background. The Plot: This book actually contains two books, neither of which can be fully realized without the other more on that below.

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Start your review of Afterworlds Afterworlds 1 Write a review Shelves: giveaway-entries , young-adult-and-new-adult , paranormal-and-supernatural , reviewed , realistic-fiction-or-contemporary , quirky , edelweiss , , reviews-to-transfer , humor So, I kinda loved this book, its intelligence, its meta-awareness, and the way a lovely coming-of-age story is packaged inside a clever satire-bordering-on-love-story to the YA publishing world.

As such, Im baffled by the somewhat low reviews on this one. I could be completely off-base, and maybe I am seeing what I want to see because I want an excuse for liking this book as much So, I kinda loved this book, its intelligence, its meta-awareness, and the way a lovely coming-of-age story is packaged inside a clever satire-bordering-on-love-story to the YA publishing world.

First, a little background. The Plot: This book actually contains two books, neither of which can be fully realized without the other more on that below. The main story revolves around Darcy. Darcy is 18, Indian, and, as she later learns, a lesbian. She has almost a year to submit her final revisions before publication. Her story is a contemporary coming-of-age tale as she decides to defer college and live her dream by moving to New York to live as a novelist by immersing herself in the YA writing world.

The second story, entitled Afterworlds, is the novel that Darcy actually wrote. This story is presumably in its final form and is a fairly typical paranormal romance. The two stories alternate chapters, and the brilliance of this is in seeing how the two stories intertwine.

I will put these under individual spoiler tags for length. Yes, many writers, especially the young, work hard and never make it. Because writing is not easy. But many do make it, and many become overnight juggernauts. That never happens! This is just wish fulfillment! So unrealistic! First, as the author is a something year-old man who has written and traditionally published numerous novels to great success, there is nothing wish fulfilling about this.

Second, it does happen. Veronica Roth, anyone? Anna Todd? So the fact that Darcy happens to be within a small percentage of people for whom traditional publishing not only becomes a reality, but also while she is very young, should not be a deterrent to reading the book. As a main character, there has to be something compelling enough about her that you want to read it. Writing comes more easily for some than others. Some are luckier than others. That is fact. Some people are prolifically talented.

Some people have words and stories overflowing in their brains. I know one GR author who routinely writes new works in a very short period of time. Sure, the initial manuscript was picked up quickly, but it took no time at all for her to learn it was nowhere near publication ready, and she spends the next year of her life struggling to make it so. During that year, she even learns how unprepared she was for all of this - she learns that people pretendedto laugh at her jokes and love her manuscript, but the truth is, she has a long road left to haul.

Am I the only one sees the heavy satire in this story? Delightfully meta and self-aware, the main narrative routinely pokes fun at the YA writing world, including its use of common tropes. Beginning on page 2, as Darcy describes her query letter, she explains to the agent how "her novel was different from the other paranormals of the last few years. You got it - she waxes about his beauty and they kiss.

Can no one else see that Westerfeld is making jokes about his own profession? He knew fully well when he wrote that line that not only were the characters no different at all, but that they all think their book is different. As though to hammer home the point, and get in a little shade about book snobbery, someone else pays her the backhanded compliment of telling Darcy that her book is better than "the average paranormal.

Now go back to Lizzie and see its effects in action. She is immediately entranced by his beauty and kisses him within minutes of meeting him, despite being on the verge of death during a freaking terrorist attack. She writes these scenes with the sheen of someone in love, but never gives that relationship the development it needs or deserves. Darcy inability to understanding how to write such a character explains why Lizzie is flat and has virtually no negative reaction to the event.

Westerfeld Darcy has blatantly admitted to Mary Sue-ing her protag. Count how many times people talk about the first Lizzie chapter being great, but then talk about subsequent chapters falling flat or being cliched. They speak of YA authors frequently borrowing from Jane Austen. The reapers? Are shiny. Kinda sparkly, in fact. Darcy wonders how to fit the word Panopticon into her novel. Love triangle jokes. Funny exchanges discussing how The Printz Award is actually better than being knighted.

The importance of luck and timing in a book hitting its sales marks. Okay" t-shirt in all his scenes. Yet, when the masses receive what it is they want - what sells - they shred it: Exactly! Westerfeld even offers commentary on all the things it that reviewers will attack him for in the novel.

He pokes fun at his own readers, for crying out loud. Who talks this way!? What lazy dialogue. Have you? Look at any trend created or made famous by a Gen Xer or younger South Park, which is an adult show, btw, is an excellent example and you get an idea of how people really speak. Look at the reviews on this very website, many of which are articulate and smart discourses, written by millennials, but peppered with colorful language.

That simply is not the case. This dialogue is realistic enough that it could have been me having a conversation with any one of you. The same can be said for the fact that the lead character is a lesbian. There is a difference and it again brings me back to the whole, how does not one else see the obvious satirical elements at work here? She found an apartment in, like, a day! Like most young people who leave home, she has ideas on the type of "group" she wants to fit into, and she works to make it true.

She thinks she belongs with other writers, wants to find writerly clothes to wear, and live in an inspirational, hip, writerly neighborhood. Also like many young people leaving home, she is convinced that this will be easy. Her sister created a budget for her, but a cursory glance at it reveals how woefully unprepared she is and life is about to smack her in the face. She never had to think about buying a broom before. She thought she would be whisked away into YA fantasy land and live happily ever after, that her romance would be like those in the novels, never to end or have problems.

But none of that actually happens, as she learns the hard way. Although he pokes a little fun, as he does throughout the book on its myriad subjects, he also presents different viewpoints designed to let you think on the subject and draw your own conclusions. Ultimately, I loved this one. Thank you to Simon Pulse via Edelweiss for providing me with a complimentary copy of this book for review.

All quotes are taken from an uncorrected galley subject to change before publishing.

LEONOR ARFUCH PDF

Afterworlds

Darcy weathers on through the whirlwind that is a first publication and learns multiple lessons not just in YA writing, but also in romance and relationships. But the Afterworld is a place between the living and the dead, and as Lizzie drifts between our world and that of the Afterworld, she discovers that many unsolved - and terrifying - stories need to be reconciled. Upon gaining a two-book deal for her original manuscript, Darcy defers college for a year to move to New York City to conduct her rewrites and begin her second novel. Darcy is quickly swept up in the world of YA writing as she navigates her newly adult freedom, her career, and even a blossoming romance.

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